How Do I Prove I Have Medical Insurance When Seeking Treatment?

You may well have to demonstrate that you have medical insurance which will cover costs of treatment before you will be treated. But most medical insurance providers will issue cards with your name and policy details printed on them. You should also have an emergency telephone number to dial in case of difficulty about billing.

Will My Medical Insurance Premiums Increase With Age?

As people get older they are more likely to need and receive medical treatment, which means that private medical insurance premiums will usually increase with age to reflect this. As a rough guide someone aged 45 would typically pay 25% more than someone aged 35. And, a 65-year-old would tend to pay more than twice the premium of a 45-year-old. Although the exact figures differ depending on each insurer, this shows the likely variation. You can ask your insurer to provide the current premium for someone five years older than you when you ask for a quotation.

Can I Change Medical Insurers Mid-Policy?

You may change insurers. However, it is important to remember that your new insurer may not cover any previous, or existing medical conditions, which your current insurer does cover. You may also lose any premiums you have paid up front. And, the level of cover on any new policy may vary from that available with your previous insurer. It is best to check with your new insurer, or whoever is selling or arranging a new policy for you, how the change may affect your cover.

My Employer Provides Medical Insurance, Why Would I Buy My Own?

Employer-sponsored policies are often much more limited in their scope than personal cover. They generally only cover you while you are actually at work. If you are injured or taken ill outside the work environment then the policy may well not be valid and you would have to pay for your own treatment. And that is to suppose that any suitable treatment is available nearby, depending on your location and the standard of local healthcare.

Can I Change Medical Insurers Mid-Policy?

You may change insurers. However, it is important to remember that your new insurer may not cover any previous, or existing medical conditions, which your current insurer does cover. You may also lose any premiums you have paid up front. And, the level of cover on any new policy may vary from that available with your previous insurer. It is best to check with your new insurer, or whoever is selling or arranging a new policy for you, how the change may affect your cover.

each insurer, this shows the likely variation. You can ask your insurer to provide the current premium for someone five years older than you when you ask for a quotation.

I’ll Take My Chances, Why Should I Buy Medical Insurance?

The ‘I’ll take my chances’ approach is surprisingly common. Well, that’s up to you, and international medical insurance is expensive, but if you are based somewhere remote, get injured and have to be airlifted to a hospital that can deal with your condition and have to pay for this yourself, then kiss goodbye to your life savings. The bill for this sort of treatment could easily reach six figures sterling. And that is also to suppose that you will be airlifted and treated if you cannot demonstrate the means to pay.

Can I Get Medical Cover If Going To A War Zone?

If you are going on expat assignment to a war-zone, or an area where there are frequent acts of terrorism, then you will need to check the small print of your medical cover very carefully.

It is in this small print that you can find out whether treatment needed as a result of war or terrorism will be covered by the plan. Some plans will not give any cover for this at all but some only exclude the cover if the patient has been an active participant in the war or terrorism. In these cases, if the person was an innocent bystander, their medical treatment could be covered.

The wording to look out for will usually be in the benefit exclusions section of the plan wording, plan guide or plan rules. To make sure that you will be covered if you are a victim of a terrorist act, you need to look for wording that specifically excludes ‘Participation in war, riots, strikes, lock-outs, civil commotion, rebellion, revolution, insurrection, terrorism… etc’ or includes a qualifying phrase such as ‘unless the insured person sustains bodily injury whilst an innocent bystander.’

In these cases, treatment for victims of terrorist attacks will be covered (subject to all other benefits, conditions and exclusions of the plan).

If the wording makes no mention of ‘participation’ or being ‘an active participant’ or there is no ‘unless…an innocent bystander’ statement, the plan may not cover the treatment, even for passive victims.

Also check whether there are any other rules that might affect cover. For example, some providers stipulate that treatment needed as a result of war or terrorism will not be covered if a government has issued a travel warning to the country where the act of war or terror has taken place.